Press

Browse the highlights of some of our favourite press features!

NATURAL HEALTH - NOV 2019

"10 Ways to Winter-Proof Your Skin. Fight the elements and avoid a dry, dull complexion with these top tips. Pick a super serum... 

'The simplest way to explain the difference between a serum and a moisturiser is that moisturisers operate more on the surface layers on the skin, whereas serums penetrate further, delivering nutrients to the deepest layers of the skin', says Anna Brightman, co-founder of UpCircle. 'Serums leave out ingredients such as mineral oils that moisturisers often use to keep water from evaporating from the skin - they "lock in" the moisture. Serums don't need these because they operate in the deeper levels. It is because of this that some people, particularly those with very dry skin, choose to use a serum first followed by a moisturiser, as the moisturiser will help to seal in the actives and nutrients of a serum."

LSN Global - OCT 2019

"An estimated 18m tonnes of used coffee grounds are generated globally each year - a significant contribution to landfill alongside other food waste.

Recognising the scale of coffee waste, plant-based and cruelty-free brand UpCircle's skincare line repurposes coffee grounds and chai tea spices to create exfoliants and soaps.

The concentration of antioxidants in the coffee grounds intensifies after their initial use, which means consumers using UpCircle's exfoliants can tackle skin inflammation while reducing waste to landfill.

As co-founder Anna Brightman explains: 'We try to challenge people's perception of what they are considering as waste. We hope to demonstrate that these ingredients are not just as good, but could actually perform even better for their skin."

THE EVENING STANDARD -OCT 2019

"The skincare industry has long looked to the natural world to power its formulas. But now a number of brands are upping their sustainability by repurposing food waste into beauty ingredients. Here are the brands kickstarting a rubbish revolution.

Having started life as Optiat (an acronym for One Person's Trash Is Another's Treasure), UpCircle is on a circular skincare mission. Sibling founders Anna and William Brightman began by collecting used coffee grounds from London cafes for use in energising scrubs and caffeinated serums. 

Now UpCircle also uses salvaged chai tea spices in its soaps and next month a new line will feature recycled olive stones, apricot kernels and discarded argan shells."

THE FINANCIAL TIMES - OCT 2019

"The eco-movement in beauty shows no signs of abating. Look to stack your bathroom shelves with sustainable products that are not just conscious in their content but in their packaging too. 

Bar soap is undergoing a bit of a renaissance. London-based beauty brand UpCircle wraps all its face and body soaps in recyclable cardboard, and offers them on a subscription basis. Launched in 2018, UpCircle's soaps are free from palm oil - an ingredient found in most soaps and cosmetics which contributes to mass deforestation the world over - as well as being vegan and cruelty-free. 

They're created from brewed chai tea spices - try the Cinnamon + Ginger soap; the pink clay helps to soothe skin and reduce inflammation while the organic cinnamon and ginger oils give a natural-looking glow."

CHAT MAGAZINE - OCT 2019

"Best Buy: Dealing with breakouts and bumpy bits on your body? The UpCircle Fennel + Cardamom Soap Bar with Chai Spices gently exfoliates while green clay helps combat spots and draw out toxins.

 

The vegan formula includes recycled ingredients, so it's better for the environment too."

BELFAST TELEGRAPH - OCT 2019

"If your Starbucks order is always a mocha, you'll love the scent of this body scrub, which uses repurposed coffee grounds from UK cafes along with cacao seed extract, shea butter and coconut oil.

The coffee grounds slough away dead skin cells, while the oils leave your limbs feeling super smooth."

BOOTS HEALTH & BEAUTY MAGAZINE - OCT 2019

"Our pick of the hot buys in store now. Containing repurposed coffee grounds, this scrub is vegan and looks pretty, too."

ELLE - SEP 2019

"The Minty Fresh Shelfie: Keep things clean and serene with shades of cool greens and bright whites."

SHEER LUXE - SEP 2019

"A shift to plastic-free skincare is swiftly on the rise thanks to its environmental benefits. Enter – the vegan cleansing bar. This exfoliating soap is gentle enough to use on both the face and body, and its all-natural ingredients make it perfect for even the most sensitive skin.

This impressive multi-tasker cuts through daily grime - with trending pink clay to purify, reduce redness and irritation, and organic cinnamon and ginger for a reviving energy boost. Affordable, long-lasting and handmade in the UK - we’re taken with UpCircle’s entire sustainable range. Good for the planet and for your skin."

THE EVENING STANDARD - SEP 2019

"We are featuring UpCircle Beauty for its pioneering approach to upcycling natural ingredients that would otherwise go to waste and turning them into skincare products that are starting to create a buzz.

'Waste is often not synonymous with beauty and glamour. What makes us different is the way we produce our product. From the beginning we set out to put waste-fighting and the circular economy at the heart of our brand. Creating a positive environmental impact is at the heart of our product and business. We’re starting to have an impact on a bigger scale as a business and that’s exciting.'"

 

SPELL MAGAZINE - SEP 2019

"Ever think twice about the coffee grounds leftover from your daily latte? Us neither, until we heard about the environmental efforts of UpCircle Beauty. The brand repurposes waste from coffee shops - such as used coffee grounds and brewed chai tea spices - to create face and body scrubs, soaps and serums."

VEGGIE - SEP 2019

"UpCircle even repurpose their ingredients! Using leftover natural ingredients like coffee grounds and brewed chai tea spices, the brand revives waste to make skin glow. As more companies like this one champion sustainability in the beauty industry, we're hopeful the statistics will be turned around in the coming years."

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